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Bomgaars BLOG: Spring Lawn Care Tips

Posted on 03/23/2020 at 03:56 PM by Kris Kegerize

Bomgaars Blog -Lawn CAre

 

Bomgaars BLOG: Spring Lawn Care Tips
 

Tackling spring lawn care provides a just-right dose of fresh air, sunshine, and exercise—and sets your lawn on its way to season-long glory. Spring lawn chores aren’t difficult, but they do play a vital role in getting your grass on track for a healthy, productive growing season. Spring lawn chores aren't difficult, but they do play a vital role in getting your grass on track for a healthy, productive growing season.


Here are our top spring lawn care tips:

 

EARLY SPRING

Tune up your mower. Change the oil, air filter and spark plug. Clean the top and undercarriage, removing dirt and grass clippings-just be sure to detach the spark plug wire before working around the cutting blade. Don’t flip a gas mower over to clean underneath; simply lift one side and brush away dried grass. If dried grass has hardened, loosen with a hand trowel or putty knife. Sharpen the mower blade, and replace it if it has large nicks or gouges. It’s a good idea to keep an extra blade on hand so you always cut with a sharp edge. Last but not least, fill the fuel tank. If you prefer a hands-off approach, take your mower to the shop, though you will want to do it in late fall or winter to avoid spring crowds. Note, too, that a cold mower can be hard to start in early spring. Warm it up by placing it in the sun for an hour or two prior to starting. Enhance warming by placing a dark trash bag over the engine while it’s soaking up some rays. (Remove the bag before you start the mower, though!)

Clean up. Walk over your lawn and gather any twigs, branches or other debris that has appeared over winter. Dispose of trash, and add small twigs and leaves to your compost pile. Then, rake out dead grass. It can also go on the compost pile, unless it contains weeds.

 
Repair bare spots in Northern lawns. Water newly seeded areas daily for at least a week, but ideally until grass reaches mow-able height. Avoid mowing until grass is at least 2 inches tall or the same height as surrounding lawn. (Wait until late spring for Southern lawns.)

 
Prevent weeds in the North. For Northern lawns where crabgrass has been a problem in the past, apply Scotts Lawn Pro Crabgrass Preventer with Lawn Food* in early spring. Follow label directions, and only use this product if no spring seeding projects are planned.

Feed the grass. If crabgrass wasn’t a problem, apply Scotts® Lawn Pro Lawn Food to Northern lawns around the time of the first mowing. This will give nourishment to plant roots for strong growth.  With all lawn fertilizers, follow label directions carefully for best results, and don't apply additional fertilizer if you've recently applied a weed-and-feed product like one of those mentioned above.

Mow high. Adjust the mower deck to cut grass at the highest possible setting for your lawn’s type of grass. Tall grass sinks deeper roots (which can seek out moisture) and crowds out weeds. Most turf types thrive with a 3- to 4-inch blade height, which usually corresponds to a mower’s highest setting. Choose a middle setting for Zoysia grass and Centipede grass, and the lowest setting for Bermuda grass and creeping bentgrass. The rule of thumb for mowing is to remove only one-third of the total grass blade length at a time.

Edge beds. In early spring, soft soil makes edging beds a cinch. Using a sharp garden spade or half-moon edger, cut a 2- to 3-inch deep, V-shaped trench along beds to keep grass out. Maintain this edge with a string trimmer throughout the growing season, recutting only as needed. If you’re refreshing existing trench edges in spring by digging out soil or mulch that has filled the trench, toss weed-free material onto planting beds as mulch or add it to your compost pile.
 
Apply mulch. Wait until soil has warmed to refresh mulch for the growing season. Shredded mulch provides a polished finish to planting beds. Add a 2- to 3-inch layer around (but not on top of) your plants.

 

LATE SPRING
 

Overseed. Thicken a thin lawn by overseeding. If you have a cool-season grass type (Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, fine fescue, or tall fescue) use Scotts® Turf Builder® Thick’R Lawn™, which combines grass seed, fertilizer, and a soil improver into an easy-to-use product you apply with a spreader. Get your grass off to its best start by using Scotts® Turf Builder® Starter® Food for New Grass. Water newly seeded areas daily for at least the first 2 weeks.

 
Wipe out dandelions. Kill these pesky weeds with Scotts® Lawn Pro Weed & Feed, which is guaranteed to clear out dandelions and clover—all while feeding your grass to build strong roots.

Go after grubs. Late spring is the time that hibernating grubs in the lawn begin to crawl toward the surface to chew grass roots, before turning into beetles and flying off to find mates. It's also a great time to apply Scotts® GrubEx® to deal with the resulting new grubs that will hatch in coming weeks. Definitely treat for grubs if you had a problem last year or know that a neighbor is having a problem with grubs.
 
*don't apply to newly seeded areas until after the 4th mowing; wait 4 months to plants seeds after applying

 

 

Check out this WEEKS BOMGAARS FLYER > 
here are a few Great Deals!

Handheld Spreader 

Crabgrass Preventor

Weed Preventer
 
 Nutrition Granules
 

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